International Journal of Healthcare Simulation - original-research https://www.ijohs.com Default RSS Feed en-us Adi Health + Wellness <![CDATA[Impostor phenomenon in healthcare simulation educators]]> https://www.ijohs.com/article/doi/10.54531/zmtl172 Background Impostor phenomenon is the overwhelming feeling of intellectual phoniness and has been linked to decreased job satisfaction and increased levels of stress, depression and burnout. As education and healthcare institutions rely on simulation to train the current and future healthcare workforce, there is a need to improve our understanding of impostor phenomenon in the healthcare simulation context. This study investigated the prevalence of impostor phenomenon in simulation educators and examined the effect of work-related characteristics on impostor phenomenon in the simulation educator community.

Methods

In total, 148 simulation educators from nine countries participated in an online survey. Along with questions related to demographic characteristics, impostor phenomenon was measured using two scales, the Clance Impostor Phenomenon Scale (CIPS) and the Leary Impostorism Scale (LIS). Independent variables included gender, time spent on simulation activities per week, years working in simulation and team size.

Results

Impostorism was identified in 46.6% of simulation educators. A multivariate analysis of variance revealed no statistically significant interactions or main effects of gender, time spent on simulation activities per week, years working in simulation and team size on impostor phenomenon. Impostor phenomenon does not discriminate based on gender; it does not disappear with experience; and it is present regardless of the size of team.

Conclusions

Impostor phenomenon is prevalent across the healthcare simulation educator community. Given the negative impact impostor phenomenon has on well-being and career development, educators, employers and professional societies need to acknowledge the prevalence of impostor phenomenon and start a conversation to build awareness about impostor phenomenon in the healthcare simulation community. Bringing the conversation into the open is the first step to acknowledging feelings of impostorism and developing strategies to break the cycle. ]]>
<![CDATA[Simulation in plastic and reconstructive surgery: a scoping review]]> https://www.ijohs.com/article/doi/10.54531/hnpw7177 Introduction Since the origins of surgery, simulation has played an important role in surgical education, particularly in plastic and reconstructive surgery. This has greater relevance in contemporary settings of reduced clinical exposure resulting in limited work-based learning opportunities. With changing surgical curricula, it is prescient to examine the role of simulation in plastic and reconstructive surgery.

Methods

A scoping review protocol was used to identify relevant studies, with an iterative process identifying, reviewing and charting the data to derive reported outcomes and themes.

Results

Of the 554 studies identified, 52 studies were included in this review. The themes identified included simulator modalities, curriculum elements targeted and relevant surgical competencies. There was a predominance of synthetically based simulators, targeting technical skills largely associated with microsurgery, paediatric surgery and craniomaxillofacial surgery.

Discussion

Existing simulators largely address high-complexity procedures. There are multiple under-represented areas, including low-complexity procedures and simulation activities addressing communication, collaboration, management and leadership. There are many opportunities for simulation in surgical education, which requires a contextual appreciation of educational theory. Simulation may be used both as a learning method and as an assessment tool.

Conclusion

This review describes the literature relating to simulation in plastic and reconstructive surgery and proposes opportunities for incorporating simulation in a broader sense, in the surgical curriculum. ]]>
<![CDATA[Evaluating the impact of simulation-based mental health training on self-efficacy: a retrospective data analysis]]> https://www.ijohs.com/article/doi/10.54531/XRRK9799 IntroductionTraining is needed for staff who work with patients experiencing mental health issues. Self-efficacy, the belief that one is able to successfully perform a task, is a key part of transferring knowledge from training into the workplace. Without this transference, improvements on an occupational level are not thought to occur successfully. This paper investigates the impact of mental health care simulation training on self-efficacy. It further investigates the effect age and gender may have on self-efficacy outcomes in simulation training.

Methods

Participants were 829 healthcare staff attending simulation training courses from 2018–2019. Participants completed the Human Factors Skills for Healthcare Instrument pre- and post-course. Data were analysed using ANOVA, post-hoc tests and mediation analysis.

Results

Significant changes in self-efficacy were found across all participants. Individuals within the ages of 25–29 reported significantly less mean change than those between 35–45. Career stage did not seem to mediate this effect. No differences in self-efficacy were found across gender.

Conclusions

Mental health care simulation is a training method within the mental health professional field that is effective in increasing self-efficacy across a variety of courses and professions, suggesting that it can be an effective method of pedagogy.]]>