International Journal of Healthcare Simulation
Adi Health+Wellness
image
154 An Observational Study: An Examination of Eye Movements When Assessing a Deteriorating High-Fidelity Patient Simulator
DOI 10.54531/ERVK9255, Volume: 1, Issue: Supplement 1, Pages: A77-A78
Article Type: Research, Article History

Table of Contents

Highlights 

Notes 

Abstract

Background:

Simulation has been identified as one of the principles to improve patient safety [1]. To increase and advance the research with eye-tracking and simulation, the researcher piloted a longitudinal, exploratory study of eye movement. Eye tracking is considered a novel method in assessing gaze behaviour in simulation has the potential to teach novices expert eye gaze [2,3].

Aim:

The aim of this study was to explore the gaze patterns of healthcare students when assessing an HPS.

Simulation activity outline:

A longitudinal study was conducted between 2014 and 2015 at three different time points (3, 6 and 12 months) with a final transfer study (with or without a patient monitor).

Method:

The study was conducted in a simulated environment with student paramedics and operating department practitioners (N = 6). Participant eye movements were measured whilst participants assessed a simulated patient with and without a monitor.

Results:

The images represent the gaze behaviour of 1 participant at testing phase 1 (Figure 1) and phase 3 (Figure 2). The gaze pattern changes and the participant demonstrates a more holistic approach when assessing a patient in phase 3 without monitor 3.
Phase 1.
Figure 1:
Phase 1.
Phase 3.
Figure 2:
Phase 3.

Implications for practice:

Encourage the use of an algorithm from the end of the bed to recognize a deteriorating patient and teach simulation with the HPS monitor switched into the off mode. Training through the observation of gaze patterns may help develop the design of simulation alongside augmented or mixed reality technology for the future.

Harris, Ryder, and Dicks: 154 An Observational Study: An Examination of Eye Movements When Assessing a Deteriorating High-Fidelity Patient Simulator

References

1. 

Health Education England. Enhancing education, clinical practice and staff well-being. A national strategic vision for simulation and immersive technologies in health and care. TEL. 2020: 139. Available from: https://www.hee.nhs.uk/sites/default/files/documents/National%20Strategic%20Vision%20of%20Sim%20in%20Health%20and%20Care.pdf

2. 

Capogna E, Salvi F, Delvino L, Di Giacinto A, Velardo M. Novice and expert anesthesiologists’ eye-tracking metrics during simulated epidural block: a preliminary, brief observational report. 2020;13:105109. Available from: http://www.dovepress.com/by158.174.187.204

3. 

Harris K. Does gaze behaviour change when assessing a high-fidelity patient simulator? An in-depth exploratory study of healthcare students using eye-tracking technology. [Professional doctorate thesis]. Portsmouth: University of Portsmouth; 2021.
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