International Journal of Healthcare Simulation
Adi Health+Wellness
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152 A Narrative Review: Primary Research in Simulation-Based Education using Eye-Tracking Technology
DOI 10.54531/UCFQ7265, Volume: 1, Issue: Supplement 1, Pages: A75-A75
Article Type: Research, Article History

Table of Contents

Highlights 

Notes 

Abstract

Background:

There has been a gradual increase in research using technology such as eye-tracking in medical education in simulation. Subsequently, the aim of this review is to examine primary research for simulation-based education using eye-tracking technology.

Method:

The Strengthening of observational studies in epidemiology (STROBE) method was used to evaluate the reliability of the simulation and eye-tracking articles [1]. The search strategy included articles published between 2010 and 2021. Articles were searched using terms derived from McCormack et al. (2014). An electronic database search was performed in January 2021: CINAHL, Medline, SCOPUS, Web of Science, Science Direct and APA Psych INFO with 2,621 hits. The search strategy included the following Boolean terms; ‘expert’ AND ‘visual’ OR eye track* (eye tracking) AND simulat* (simulation or simulated) AND diagnos* (diagnose or diagnosis).

Findings:

The key finding from this narrative review highlighted the use of eye-tracking technology as an objective assessment tool in simulation-based education [2]. The literature reinforced the use of algorithms (e.g. ABCDE approach) when assessing a patient. Furthermore, the different gaze patterns between novices and experts were identified. There are limited studies available in simulation-based education using eye-tracking technology. Furthermore, none of the studies has measured the development of gaze patterns in simulation using a longitudinal study with a repeated simulated scenario.

Implication for practice:

Eye-tracking technology can pinpoint the exact areas the healthcare provider is gazing upon during a simulated scenario to help focus the debrief and highlight the gaze patterns. Encourage the use of algorithms when delivering simulation-based education.

Harris, Ryder, and Dicks: 152 A Narrative Review: Primary Research in Simulation-Based Education using Eye-Tracking Technology

References

1. 

Vandenbroucke JP, Elm EV, Altman DG. Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE): explanation and elaboration. Int J Surg. 2014;12(12):150024. doi: 10.1016/j.ijsu.2014.07.014.

2. 

Shinnick MA. Validating Eye tracking as an objective assessment tool in simulation. Clin Simul Nursing. 2016;12(10):43846.
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